Thursday, September 29, 2011

Blog Tour: Sins of the Angels with Linda Poitevin

Angels Gather Here Blog Tour - Click to view schedule
 
There aren’t all that many Canadian authors writing Paranormal books, so I was very happy when I discovered Linda Poitevin, a Canadian debut author, and I’m honored to be part of the tour!
Picture

A detective with a secret lineage. An undercover Hunter with a bullet-proof soul. And a world made to pay for the sins of an angel…

Homicide detective Alexandra Jarvis answers to no one. Especially not to the new partner assigned to her in the middle of a gruesome serial killer case-a partner who is obstructive, irritatingly magnetic, and arrogant as hell.

Aramael is a Power—a hunter of the Fallen Angels.  A millennium ago, he sentenced his own brother to eternal exile for crimes against humanity. Now his brother is back and wreaking murderous havoc in the mortal realm. To find him, Aramael must play second to a human police officer who wants nothing to do with him and whose very bloodline threatens both his mission and his soul.

Now, faced with a fallen angel hell-bent on triggering the apocalypse, Alex and Aramael have no choice but to join forces, because only together can they stop the end of days.

Purchase: Amazon | Book Depository

Please welcome her warmly as she discuses the geography of Sins of the Angels, released September 27th by Penguin!
 

Taking Sides: Does a story setting need to be American?

For Canadian authors trying to break into the US market, the question of setting seems to be a perpetual one: on which side of the border should your story happen?

The prevailing opinion is that, if you want to sell to a US publisher (especially one of the big boys) or even sign with a US agent, you need to choose an American setting. I’m living and breathing proof, however, that this isn’t necessarily so. While many editors and agents are adamant that readers demand American settings, there’s another school of thought that says, “It depends.”

I first raised the issue of setting when I signed with my agent. SINS OF THE ANGELS was set in Toronto—did she think I should move the story to a US city instead? For those of you unfamiliar with Canadian geography, Toronto is a very modern, world-class city of about 2.5 million (5.5 if you include the Greater Toronto Area) sitting on the shores of Lake Ontario. To my surprise, my agent suggested we hold off on any changes of that nature until we’d found an editor for the book, and then leave the decision up to him/her. She, herself, didn’t foresee a problem … and she was right.

When SINS found a home with Penguin USA, I discussed the setting issue again, this time with my new editor. The consensus at Penguin’s end was that leaving the book in Toronto was not a problem. By this point, I have to admit I was royally confused. What about the whole common-knowledge thing that claimed U.S. readers wouldn’t buy books set in Canada? “It depends,” replied my editor.

She explained it this way: in some books, the setting plays such a pivotal role in the story that it almost becomes a character. In those instances, readers seem to prefer American settings (and hence, so do agents and editors). In SINS OF THE ANGELS, however, the setting acts as a backdrop. While some place names are mentioned, they’re just names and aren’t critical to the plotline or the story outcome. The story could be set in any city, really, as long as it was big, urban, and possessed the usual traits of sirens, tall buildings, a metropolitan police force, and plenty of dark, sketchy alleys.

And so SINS remains in Toronto for a number of reasons. First, I trust my editor’s opinion. Second, I’m not a well-traveled person (though I hope to change that one day) and I wasn’t comfortable moving the story to a U.S. city I’d never visited. While I’ve never lived in Toronto, I’ve at least spent some time there. Third, being married to a cop, I have a built-in reference at my fingertips. Procedures between the U.S. and Canada may be similar, but there are still differences—and setting the story on Canadian soil means I have a much better chance of getting the details right.

Ultimately, readers will decide whether or not my decision was a wise one. If I’ve done my job well, then I think they will become immersed in SINS OF THE ANGELS because of the story, and the setting will remain what it’s intended to be—a backdrop to kick-ass action, suspense, and supernatural impossibilities.

But you’re the readers … what do you think? Does it matter to you if a story is set way up here in the north? ;)

-------------------------

Thank you so much Linda for stopping by <3 Can’t wait to meet you in November!

giveaway

Linda & Penguin would like to over you guys a chance to win one of two copies of Sins of the Angels!

Open Internationally

To enter, leave a comment answering Linda’s question.

You can earn one (1) extra entry for spreading the word, please provide a link in a second comment.

Ends October 12th, 2011.

tyngasig

Tynga is a 28 years old mom from Montreal, working as a lab technician in an hospital specialized in heart disease. In her free time, she enjoys reading all things Paranormal and blogging about them. You might also catch her watching an hockey game. Make sure to say hi on twitter!

Follow Tynga on: Facebook | Twitter

48 People left their mark' :

  1. I don't care where a story is set. In fact it's fun to read about different locations.

    sgiden at verizon.net

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  2. Well, I've never been in the US, so i have to say that all cities are the same to me. I Love when we're outside of the US in the story, but i don't really care. I never read about Toronto in a book, and i like the different locations,too. So i say it was definitely a wise decision!

    rea0903(at)gmail(dot)com

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  3. Tweeted: https://twitter.com/#!/andreana92/status/119432796140879873

    rea0903(at)gmail(dot)com

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  4. I think it doesn't really matter where the story takes place, it's always so interesting to discover the world the author has created for a story. As I don't live in the US, it makes me travel a little with the place the characters evolve.
    Thanks for the giveaway !

    ellana_(at)hotmail(dot)fr

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  5. As long as the setting fits the plot I'm game. With "fits" I mean both possible ways. As backdrop OR an essential part of the story. As long as the author does her research I look forward to different settings.
    However, when it comes to the characters...I have read a LOT of books with German characters (heroine's mom born in Germany; the old neighbor from Germany...) - I haven't yet found one withOUT any errors. Spelling, grammar & such.
    With Canada / USA it's probably more about the various phrases (or as you've mentioned procedures)
    I vote: stick with your setting
    Best!
    Sasse
    _yay_ @ http://bookthatthing.blogspot.com
    GFC: _yay_
    sk_86(at)gmx(dot)de

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  6. It doesn't matter to me where the setting is, it's the wonderful feeling of submerging myself into a story I want.

    littl lamb lst at yahoo dot com

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  7. I think settings are very important. Toronto is a great city to use as the setting.

    vsloboda(at)gmail(dot)com

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  8. It doesn't really matter where the setting is, if you ask me. Maybe it's because I've never been to the US or to Canada, and the big and crowded cities are all the same to me :)

    Thank you so much for the chance to win a copy of your book, Linda! :)
    mikki-mano@hotmail.com

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  9. +1 for tweeting: https://twitter.com/vojalyn/status/119455998711840769

    Thanks again,
    mikki-mano@hotmail.com

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  10. It doesn't matter to me where the story is set as long as the story is good. Your book sounds great. :)
    Crystal816[at]hotmail[dot]com

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  11. As I've never been to Canada or the US I have no idea what the relative cities are like anyway :)
    To me a good story and characters are far more important than the setting.
    irgl7(at)bonzo15(dot)plus(dot)com

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  12. Well, as a fellow Canadian, I'm THRILLED to have a home grown UF book to read. It's one of the things that attracted me the most about Sins of the Angels. That and a kick ass story that is! Great post!

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  13. Honestly, it doesn't matter to me. In fact, I can't wait to have a different setting, and usually, those are the most interesting ones! I've already experienced Japanese and Swedish settings, so I'm open to changes. =)

    Plus, I've been to Toronto, and LOVED it!

    asma.aljeelani (at) gmail (dot) com

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  14. I don't think it needs to be american. In fact, I love international settings. I mean, how else am I supposed to get there? lol

    Vivien
    deadtossedwaves at gmail dot com

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  15. +1 spread here
    http://www.goodreads.com/event/show/147696-blog-tour-sins-of-the-angels-with-linda-poitevin

    Vivien
    deadtossedwaves at gmail dot com

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  16. I like reading books set in different locations. In fact, one of the reasons I enjoy Lynsay Sands' vampire books so much is that they're set in Canada.

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  17. I don't mind where the settings are at in book. I never ever really left California, so it's nice to see different locations in books.

    Littopandaxpress(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  18. It's great to have so much positive feedback -- and nice to know my editor was right. One less thing I have to worry about, lol! Thank you all for stopping by to comment! :)

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  19. It doesn't matter to me if the story is set in the US, Canada, Europe, or anywhere else. As long as it's an interesting tale with great characters, that's what's important. I actually enjoy books set in Canada, it's nice to read about cities I don't that much about.

    Barbed1951 at aol dot com

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  20. Settings for stories never bothers me, it's the story that does it all.
    My question:
    when you decided to become a writer how did you know where to start writing?

    dsadler53@yahoo.ca

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  21. A very interesting topic! As a Canadian writing crime fiction, I spent a lot of time thinking about the setting for my series. And yes, because I had my eye set on a U.S. publisher, I decided to go with a U.S. setting (and to be honest, it was one that I'd loved since I was 13). But I also wanted my location to be more than a backdrop. In the first book, we worked hard to make the setting of the burials almost a character in the book. So perhaps in my case it would have made a difference. And yes, it took several trips there for research. On the other hand, maybe I was just looking for an excuse to go back!

    Interestingly, when I went to Bloody Words in 2010, Canadian agent Helen Heller was there and her first piece of advice was never to set a book in Toronto. HA! Looks like you proved her wrong! *two thumbs up*

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  22. Hi, Diane --I'm not sure I understand your question...are you talking about where as in what setting I chose?

    Jen, I think that's what my editor was talking about, so it sounds like you made a great decision. And thank you for the thumbs-up, lol!

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  23. I love stories set in the north; much better than reading about sweaty people! Gross.

    b(dot)cardone(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  24. For me, part of the enjoyment of a book is the setting-be it here in the US or elsewhere. Generally, I really like those set out of the US because it lets me travel in my mind to places I've not yet been (or may never get to). So as a US reader I do not mind a setting that is not US.

    mljfoland AT hotmail DOT com

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  25. +1 Tweet: http://twitter.com/#!/Rogue237/status/119599157215371264

    mljfoland AT hotmail DOT com

    ReplyDelete
  26. I like reading about different locations. Give me a great story to go with it & I'm happy.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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  27. I can believe the statement that US readers like US settings but look at it from the other side.

    Most non-US readers have probably no in depth knowledge of most US cities, yet they will buy book in those settings.

    Are US readers so different from non -US ?

    Seems strange to me.

    Thanks fo the giveaway.

    Carol T

    buddytho {at} gmail DOT com

    ReplyDelete
  28. Reading avout differetn locations make me feel like I was there, so it's like virtual traveling)
    kapranova.sofija@gmail.com

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  29. As I aven't been to the US yet I don't necessite my stories to be set there. But it's so much fun if a book is set in a location I have been to (like Paris, London) and I find it a real treat when it mentions my hometown (Budapest) and places I know there! :-D

    I loved that SINS was set in Toronto, maybe it wasn't such an issue for me, because I have loved Kelley Armstrong's Women of the Otherworld series for years, which is also set in Canada :-)

    Congrats on the release Linda!!

    stella.exlibris (at) gmail (dot) com

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  30. The location of the book is not terribly important to me, other than the world building - I want to be able to see in my imagination where the story is and get to know the characters and their place in that world. Thank you for sharing today and for the awesome giveaway opportunity, I would love to read Sins of the Angels.

    dz59001[at]gmail[dot]com

    ReplyDelete
  31. I tweeted this wonderful post and fun:
    http://www.tyngasreviews.com/2011/09/blog-tour-sins-of-angels-with-linda.html via @Tynga

    dz59001[at]gmail[dot]com

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  32. I think that as long as the story is good it doesn't matter where the setting is located.
    audie@wickerness.com

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  33. I don't care where a story is set, be it a real or made up location. I do appreciate a few local items or places of interest thrown in to give it a real feel. Sara Paretsky uses a lot of Chicago and Chicagoland locations in her books.

    acm05atjuno.com

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  34. I dont care where the location of the story is. It can even be made up. It just needs to have a good storyline and characters. Please enter me in contest. I would love to read this book. Tore923@aol.com

    ReplyDelete
  35. I don't care where a story is set as long as the author can paint a clear picture of that place. But I do have a soft spot for books that take place in Canada as I am Canadian. I have yet to read a UF or YA novel that takes place in Vancouver and I would pick one up instantly if it did!

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  36. Thank you all for the great comments, and for stopping by!

    @Rebs: You're in luck...believe it or not, book 2--Sins of the Son--is set in (drum roll please)...VANCOUVER! Is that serendipity, or what? ;)

    Have a fabulous weekend, everyone! :)

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  37. @ lindapoitevin
    oOo that's exciting! Did you grow up out in Vancouver?

    ReplyDelete
  38. @Reb
    Born in the Kootenays, lived in Richmond for a year in grade school, lived most of my childhood in Prince George, moved to Ottawa when I was 24. Still have many friends and family in BC. Visited Vancouver last year for research for the book. :)

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  39. I actually prefer Toronto as a setting simply because it's foreign, yet not so foreign that it has to be the setting is a strong focus of the story (as London and Paris usually are), and it feels familiar, since Canadian jargon tends to be quite similar to American jargon.

    amy408(at)gmail(dot)com

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  40. It doesn't matter to be where a story is set, whether it's in my area or elsewhere so long as it's interesting. Sometimes I discover a new place to visit even if it's in my own town.

    Cambonified (at) yahoo (dot) com

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  41. Not at all! In fact, I'd rather an author set their book in a world and/or city that they know well and are comfortable in. That way they get the details right and make it more believable and real.

    Besides, I’m from Down Under so chances are I haven't been there anyway, lol. At least I'm stepping into (figuratively speaking of course) a whole new world than I'm used to anyway.

    Thanks for the giveaway and for making it international!

    I tweeted too for ya: http://twitter.com/#!/RachyBee/status/119981330875424769

    rachybee101@live.com.au

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  42. It would matter to me where the story is set as long as it is described well to take me that place. :) Thanks for the giveaway

    I am follower
    sariahwalters at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  43. There is no reason that the setting has to be in America, in fact as long as there is some description of the setting to go along with the location there is no reason that the setting can't be anywhere in the world or on another world.

    Morganlafey86(at)aol(dot)com

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  44. tweeted: https://twitter.com/#!/YearofTiger86/status/121740238371565568

    Morganlafey86(at)aol(dot)com

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  45. I don't really care where a story is set I guess it depends on the story sometimes! Thank you so much sounds like a great book thanks for the chance!
    tishajean@ charter.net

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  46. Tweeted too
    https://twitter.com/#!/latishajean/status/123844408448794624
    tishajean@ charter.net

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  47. I don't think it matters where the book is set as long as it's a good story. But, this book sounds amazing. Thanks for the giveaway!!!

    mandaespi at gmail dot com

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  48. I'm actually from the Uk so I like a variety of places for my stories to be set - actually I've visited Canada on many occasions so I quite like reading books that are set there! :-)

    Mel S
    notanotherbookblog(at)hotmail(dot)co(dot)uk

    ReplyDelete